she-doesnt-wear-any-wings:

cuteminimo
on etsy

Is that mannequin single?

(Source: miggylol)

  • 9 hours ago
  • 97684

tehnakki:

stereksextape:

I ALWAYS THOUGHT THE HDR EFFECT WAS HARD BUT IT’S ACTUALLY LIKE A 5 STEP THING BESIDES DUPLICATING AND FLATTENING SHIT HOLY FUCK I CAN DO IT. I’M SO EXCITED WOW THAT’S LOVELY and I have to share because no one every taught me this.

  1. Open your picture.
  2. Duplicate layer (Ctrl+J)
  3. Overlay that shit 50%
  4. Flatten image (Ctrl+E)
  5. Duplicate that one layer that you have now (Ctrl+J)
  6. Desaturate (Shift+Ctrl+U)
  7. Invert (Ctrl+I)
  8. Gaussian Blur it to 40
  9. Now overlay that B&W Blurred image
  10. Duplicate and sharpen if necessary
  11. AMAZEMENT WOW HOLY SHIT

MOTHERFUCKER, I’VE BEEN TRYING TO FIND THIS FOR HOURS. TAGG(NG THE SHIT OUT OF THIS.

  • 5 days ago
  • 61574
  • 1 week ago
  • 5205

wordsandchocolate:

I made a slideshow about how to create a fictional character… I got most of the information from the ‘start writing fiction’ (free) course on the OpenUniversity website and found it incredibly useful so here’s a visual version for you :)

  • 1 week ago
  • 100385

dendroica:

Arctic’s Tyrannosaur Was a Tiny Terror

In a study published Wednesday in PLoS One, paleontologists Anthony Fiorillo and Ronald Tykoski of Dallas, Texas’ Perot Museum of Nature and Science have named a diminutive tyrannosaur that once trod beneath the Arctic’s northern lights.

The researchers have dubbed the dinosaur Nanuqsaurus hoglundi – a title combining the Iñupiaq word for polar bear with a species name honoring geologically-minded philanthropist Forrest Hoglund.

Bones of the tyrannosaur were recovered at the Kikak-Tegoseak Quarry on Alaska’s North Slope. Even with continental shifts since the Cretaceous, the site would have been within the Arctic Circle during the heyday of Nanuqsaurus.

Relatively little of the dinosaur has been found so far. The material Fiorillo and Tykoski drew upon to name the dinosaur consists of disarticulated skull bones, including parts of the skull roof and the jaws. Some of these bones were previously thought to belong to the classic tyrannosaurs Albertosaurus and Gorgosaurus, but the new analysis by Fiorillo and Tykoski found that the North Slope fossils differ in the arrangement of the bones on the skull roof and the size of the tooth sockets. And since some of the skull bones are fused, this Nanuqsaurus was likely at or approaching adult size.

Size matters, in this case, because the most immediately striking aspect of Nanuqsaurus is the tyrannosaur’s small size. Using other tyrannosaur skulls as a guide, Fiorillo and Tykoski hypothesize that the skull of a mature Nanuqsaurus was not much more than two feet long. The skull of the largest known T. rex – the biggest known tyrannosaurs – were about five feet long. Likewise, at an estimated 25 feet long, Nanuqsaurus could have stood in the shadow of a 40-foot-long T. rex.

Still, despite the size difference, T. rex and Nanuqsaurus were relatively close relatives.

(via Phenomena: Laelaps)

  • 2 weeks ago
  • 101

(Source: pret-a-pierre)

  • 2 weeks ago
  • 63307

katzensprotte:

I drew some freenoses so that the cumbernoses don’t feel lonely.

  • 2 weeks ago
  • 1075

In Which Diversity Isn’t a Myth

clementive:

Ok. I’m tired of the typical vampire, werewolf and fairy.I’m also tired of the occidental-centrism in mythology. Hence, this list. 

I tried to include as many cultural variants as I could find and think of. (Unfortunately, I was restricted by language. Some Russian creatures looked very interesting but I don’t speak Russian…) Please, add creatures from your culture when reblogguing (if not already present). It took me a while to gather all those sites but I know it could be more expansive. I intend on periodically editing this list. 

Of note: I did not include specific legendary creatures (Merlin, Pegasus, ect), gods/goddesses/deities and heroes.

Read More

  • 2 weeks ago
  • 50256

fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn:

An incredulous fuck-ton of animal/human juxtaposition references.

Six of the above images are by Warehouse Hawkins.

[From various sources]

  • 2 weeks ago
  • 1753